“Ready, Set, Get Going…

Half Marathon Italy

…because, I know you can run faster than that.”

Don’t you just love internal dialog?  It’s so nurturing.

So I’m back at it, running again after a long break which always feels like starting over, so if you have just begun a resolution routine, I’m right there with you.  I take these long breaks from time to time, ALWAYS regretting it later.

Perhaps you have seen me out there running?  I’m the one looking like the Bionic Woman in the slow motion sequence, na-na-na, na-na-na, you get the picture?  I mean the ORIGINAL Bionic Woman, Lindsay Wagner, as Jaime Sommers, one of my childhood heroes:

Slow motion is better than no motion! 

Today as I was plodding along wondering why I do this, because it actually hurts…I realized that I do get to think more clearly when I’m running than at any other moment of my day.  The ideas flow more easily as oxygen struggles toward my brain, gasping.

My sister shared this on Facebook and it seemed right:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=389993041086350&set=a.344039039015084.81833.343998622352459&type=1&ref=nf

Are we ever done?  I mean as long as we’re still breathing?  Nope.  I keep thinking, when I hit this landmark or this weight or get this mileage under my belt I will have reached my goal, and then what?  Quit?  No way!  Because, you see my dears, the goal keeps moving.  Funny, when I went looking for a photo to insert here, it turns out, “moving the goalpost” is a metaphor, well, what do you know?

So if you stop always pushing forward, well then, do you lose all the ground you have formerly covered or maybe just some of it, provided you get up, dust off the cobwebs and ask yourself, okay it’s a new day, so what’s next?

P.S.  If you like running and/or blogs about athletics, check out these:

http://sportsandthecross.wordpress.com/

http://jumpforjoyphotoproject.wordpress.com/

http://runningonoatmeal.wordpress.com/

http://willrunforglitter.com/

http://urbanrunninggirl.wordpress.com/

Maintaining Momentum

Thought for the week: We all spend time in the writing ditch; how you get out of it is up to you.

In the midst of writing and re-writing my first novel, “Seeing Scarlet”, a second novel materialized. Initially, I denied it time and energy due to WOCD, writer’s obsessive compulsion disorder, refusing to write novel number two, because novel number one was not yet complete.

However, this new character, Janice Morrison, would not go away. Every time I stalled out writing Scarlet’s story, Janice would tap on the back door of my brain.

“Hay, it’s me again, Janice. Got a second?”

“No, I’m busy. Come back later,” I grumbled.

“You still working on that book? Come, on! I’ve been waitin’ long enough here to tell you something. You won’t believe this one.”

Janice would just not hear me and I refused to listen because I was busy being stuck in the ‘writing ditch’, a place where you cannot move forward or backward, without digging yourself a deeper hole.

Frustrated anyway, I finally took a woefully needed break from Scarlet and tuned in to Janice. Before long, I had written twenty-five thousand words of her story. Now that number is nearly double. My second novel, “Secret Agent of…God?” is character driven, focused, true to the tale that I set out to write and is a narrative that technically told itself. The best part…it was fun to write again.

I learned something valuable from Janice. The protagonist sets the tone of the story and decides where it will ultimately go. In Scarlet’s case, I had tried to mold her into someone she had no interest in becoming. I became confused, thinking I was writing my story at times, but Scarlet is definitely not me.

I let Scarlet’s issues stew on the back burner for a bit and worked on Janice’s predicament and other projects, short stories and flash fiction for contests until one day, an answer to Scarlet’s problem presented itself.

While watching my eight-year-old outrunning ten and eleven-year-olds at her running camp, being fiercely competitive at all things, easily able to outsmart me with minimal effort, she was already so confident and different from me, at her age. I realized something, I gave her life and shared a few genes, but I can never take credit for how amazing she is, all on her own.

This triggered my ascent. I needed to accept Scarlet’s individuality as I have my daughters. As Scarlet’s creator, I owed her this much. When I began blending in this new perspective, a bright and more vivid character emerged.

Ask yourself if you have another tale to tell, at least temporarily. Write poetry, even badly, create a children’s book, draft a short story, pen an article about anthills. Meanwhile, let your character quandary simmer until a solution comes bubbling to the surface; when it does, simply stir in the spice you found before your ideas burn out or evaporate. At the very least, a fresh story will keep you company and give you something to chew on while you wait for a figurative tow truck to conjure a productive way out of the ‘writing ditch’.

Thank you for reading and keep writing!

Yet to come: Seeking Support: Surprises and Stumbling Blocks; The Benefits of Insomnia; My First Writers Conference; Query Letter Hell!; The ABC’s…Author Websites, Blogging and Contests, Oh, My!